The amazing Hill Station of India

The hill stations are high-altitude towns used, especially by European colonialists, as a place of refuge from the summer heat. They are prevalent in Southeast Asia and the Indian Subcontinent, particularly India.
The Indian subcontinent has seven principal mountain ranges and the largest of all is the Himalayas that lies in the northern part of India. The famous peaks and ranges include the Kangchenjunga range in the Eastern Himalayas which frames the hill stations of Darjeeling and Gangtok as well as the Nanda Devi in Uttarakhand. Then there is Shivalik range that also lies within the same region has some famous hill stations that include Dalhousie, Kullu, Shimla, Nanital sahyadri range and many more.

“I’m sure you would have the same feeling I had”

Most of the hill stations in India were developed by the British, around a central mall, to get respite from the oppressive summer heat. Many have picturesque lakes as their focal point, making them excellent places for boating activities.
Most of the hill stations in India are located in Jammu and Kashmir, Himachal Pradesh, Uttarakhand, Sikkim, West Bengal, Arunachal Pradesh, Nagaland and Meghalaya in the Himalayas and in Maharashtra, Karnataka, Tamil Nadu and Kerala in Western ghats. Some of the hill stations in India are listed below by state.

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Since all these hill stations are world-famous they are frequently visited by tourists on a summer vacation tour. Due to this almost all of the above hill stations are well connected by rail, road and air services to major Indian cities.
The British Raj, and in particular the British Indian Army, founded perhaps 50 of the 80-odd hill stations in the Indian subcontinent; the remainder were built by various Indian rulers over the centuries as places of leisure or even as permanent capitals. They established the stations to escape the blistering heat of the long Indian summer.

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Mussoorie is a hill station and a municipal board in the Dehradun District of the northern Indian state of Uttarakhand. It is about 35 km from the state capital of Dehradun and 290 km north of the national capital of New Delhi. This hill station is in the foothills of the Garhwal Himalayan range. The adjoining town of Landour, which includes a military cantonment, is considered part of ‘greater Mussoorie’, as are the townships of Barlowganj and Jharipani.
Being at an average altitude of 1,880 metres, Mussoorie, with its green hills and varied flora and fauna, is a fascinating hill resort. Commanding snow ranges to the northeast and glittering views of the Doon Valley and Shiwalik ranges in the south, the town was once said to present a ‘fairyland’ atmosphere to tourists. 

Arriving in Mussoorie I couldn’t believe my eyes, the beauty is really amazing. The air so different from the air in the big city’s. If you are visiting India this is a place you must visit I’m sure you would have the same feeling I had. Unbelievable!!

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